THIS columnist suspects that the Confederation of African Football (CAF) has a cure for the Ebola virus disease.

It is either that, or the mandarins populating the corridors of power at CAF house are a callous lot who don’t give two hoots about the seriousness of this epidemic.

One says this in utter disbelief that the custodians of football on the continent are hellbent that the 30th edition of their number one competition should continue next year.

It is scheduled for January 17 to February 8. Designated hosts Morocco no longer want to touch the tournament with a budge barge pole.

They are pushing for a postponement. And rightly so.

This thing is just not a health scare. The Ebola virus is a dreaded disease that has ravaged the three west African countries of Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia.

It has flushed out more than 4 000 lives. That is not a figure to be scoffed at.

Given the situation at hand, one would expect shelving the shindig to be a mere formality rather than this protracted cloud of indecision.

But hell, no. The fathers of the African football chapel want the show to go on. A delegation led by CAF’s president Issa Hayatou will trek to Morocco next month to confirm CAF’s position that they are against the postponement.

In anticipation of Morocco digging in their heels and officially pulling out from hosting because of Ebola concerns, CAF are already scrambling around for replacements.

Its secretary-general, Hicham El Amrani, has written to other football federations “capable of staging the 2015 event”.

But hell, no. The fathers of the African football chapel want the show to go on. A delegation led by CAF’s president Issa Hayatou will trek to Morocco next month to confirm CAF’s position that they are against the postponement.

Among them is our own South African Football Association (Safa). They must categorically and in no uncertain terms tell CAF thanks, but no thanks.

Both CAF and Safa should not risk putting our country through a gravely risky situation.

In any case, Safa are a football governing body — not the government of the Republic of South Africa.

They cannot make any commitments to CAF. Only the government can.

And the government is not the lot in shiny German sedans with blaring black sirens. We, the people, are the government.

And we should never be exposed to a gravely risky health epidemic. Not now. Not ever.

Besides, we have just hosted Afcon 2013.

Moreover, while this hosting business is nice, it is a helluva expensive exercise.

Worse, Afcon comes with that non-profitable, expenditure- wasting companion called the African Nations Championship.

Lest we forget, this country also has other challenges.

We can use the money to eradicate the dignity-stripping bucket toilet system. We can invest in improving education and health facilities.

Why can’t Afcon 2015 not be postponed? Are CAF concerned about their commitments and obligations to sponsors?

Can those financial considerations trump the preservation of life?

Are they and their sponsors so consumed and driven by greed that they care not about what is happening right before their eyes?

I love and live for football. But not at the expense of exposing South Africa or any other country of our continent to a deadly, dreaded disease.

It is too great a risk, not worth taking.

Morocco do not want to endanger their population. Why should we or any other country expose their populace?

I find it curious that the author of CAF’s letter to Safa is Hicham El Amrani.

Guess what, the brother is Moroccan. In conclusion, the African Nations Cup 2015 must not come to South Africa. It must not go to any other country. It must be postponed.

It can only go ahead if its custodian, CAF, can confirm that they have a cure for Ebola. Hosting Afcon 2015 will be tantamount to dicing with death. Period.

See more articles