NIZAAM Carr is a special player. Invest in him Heyneke Meyer. Invest in him SA. Meyer could make a convincing argument that there currently is no place for Carr in his Springbok squad. Who do you leave out?

Only a certain amount of loose forwards will be chosen and all of those who were regulars in the Rugby Championship will tour the Northern Hemisphere next month.

Meyer could not be accused of bias if he omitted Carr, but it would be such a missed opportunity if Carr was left to rest in Cape Town. I am a disciple of the Carr skill set and it adds a dimension to an already impressive array of skills among the current Bok loose forwards .

Carr’s best position is No8 but he is capable of also playing as a blindside flanker. Some question his size but he is no smaller than some particularly influential and world-class loose-forwards.

Incumbent Springbok No8 Duane Vermeulen is a different beast in what he offers the Boks and was easily the standout player in this season’s Rugby Championship. Vermeulen, alongside New Zealander Kieran Read, currently sets the international standard of a match-winning No 8.

Carr, potentially, could be spoken of being the world’s best in the future. That is how good I believe he can be, career-threatening injuries notwithstanding. He can only benefit from exposure to Meyer’s Bok culture and senior Bok players, among them two of his Super Rugby regional colleagues Vermeulen and the Japan-based Schalk Burger.

Meyer announces the Bok tourists at 11.30am today. Do a dance before then in the name of Carr, who is good enough to play Test rugby next month should injury befall any of those who excelled earlier in the year.

Carr will get stronger and bigger. Don’t forget several Bok coaches overlooked Vermeulen when he was playing brilliant rugby for the Stormers. It now seems absurd that it took Vermeulen so long to get a game in a Bok jersey.

Meyer won’t necessarily be influenced by Currie Cup form because the competition is secondary to Super Rugby, but the coach has a proven track record for identifying X-factor players and putting in place a road map that gives these players every opportunity to become world-class performers.

Handrè Pollard is the most obvious example. Meyer, when he saw Pollard play as a 15-year-old, said he would be a Springbok and that his skill set was that formidable that he needed to aspire to becoming a legacy-inspiring Springbok.

Carr, like Pollard, doesn’t need another season of Super Rugby to convince of his talents, but even if Meyer feels an off-season programme will best suit the Province looseforward, I’d still back Carr to force his hand before next year’s World Cup. Again, fitness permitting because any player’s season can end with one tackle.

Carr will get stronger and bigger. Don’t forget several Bok coaches overlooked Vermeulen when he was playing brilliant rugby for the Stormers. It now seems absurd that it took Vermeulen so long to get a game in a Bok jersey.

All he needed was one coach to back him. Meyer was that coach. All Carr needs is similar faith within a national squad system.

He is a player that makes the game look so easy and those who dismiss his national claims because of a perceived physical vulnerability should consider the versatility he brings to a match-day squad and the attacking dimension he adds.

Read is the master of running magnificent attacking lines as a No8. Carr’s feel for the game, his time on the ball and his ability to offload in the tackle is Read-like in potential, if not just yet Read.

Somehow I don’t think he is going to be included but he deserves every column inch of awareness because his attributes have to be celebrated.

Western Province must be applauded for winning the Currie Cup and the Lions will be wiser for the experience of playing in a final. As will flyhalf Marnitz Boshoff, who missed more place kicks in the final than he did in the entire Super Rugby season.

Boshoff’s horrid goalkicking day was an aberration and I’d also punt for him to be retained as part of the Bok touring squad. He is a fine player and one of the game’s best goalkickers. He will still be remembered for winning more games than he lost.

Public opinion would probably favour his omission after the misery of his goalkicking in Newlands on Saturday. But he, like Carr, makes for a better South African rugby future because he is a fine rugby player, as are so many who played in the domestic final.

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